Pedestrian Dynamics 4.1 released!

Pedestrian Dynamics® 4.1 released!

For all leading construction companies, architects, engineers, and consultants using crowd risk analysis. We are happy to announce the release of our crowd simulation software Pedestrian Dynamics® 4.1!

With Pedestrian Dynamics® you can increase customer experiences, decrease costs, and contribute to your innovation programs to contribute to more safe, secure, and sustainable infrastructures and events.

With the release of Pedestrian Dynamics® 4.1, the following improvements of the software are performed:

  • Increased user-friendliness
  • BIM improvements
  • New physical distancing feature for stands
  • New tutorials for recording videos and density output

Increased user-friendliness and BIM improvements

To increase the user-friendliness several improvements are made which will help in model building, collecting data for an experiment but also give you an overview and control over the visualization. Moreover, the BIM import is improved to build models faster and easier. Also, adjustments have been made for Windows 11.

New physical distancing feature for stands

Around the world, we are struggling still with the effect of the COVID pandemic. Pedestrian Dynamics® simulation software today is used to implement physical distance and other pandemic rules and regulations. Already in Pedestrian Dynamics® 4.0, we introduced the physical distancing algorithm and included output to examine the proximity of agents. With this new release, we have added the feature to easily model seating areas when applying physical distancing. Due to the physical distancing rules, often not all seats in an area are allowed to use. Several properties have been added to a stand section to easily indicate which seats can be used and which should be unavailable.

New tutorials for recording videos and density output

Several improvements to our documentation are made. We have restructured our ‘Help’ file making it easier to find tutorials and ‘How to guides’ specific topics. These tutorials are now also easily accessible as PDFs via a drop-down menu on the ‘Help’ tab. We also added new documentation.

Download our release highlights document to read more details about the new improvements in Pedestrian Dynamics® 4.1. 

Curious what Pedestrian Dynamics® can do for you, your company, and your customers? Please contact us, or try our software free of charge.

How simulation contributes to Livable, Safe, and Sustainable cities

How simulation contributes to Livable, Safe, and Sustainable cities

Today about 50% of the world’s population lives in urban areas. Expected is, that by 2050 this number will increase to about 68%. Not only the numbers are increasing, but also the needs are getting more diverse. Urban environments are exciting places to live, work and unwind. But how do we combine all of these aspects in a city? These Metropolitan Areas are not only growing fast but also changing continuously. We have to act faster and more adequate to trends and specific circumstances; like ‘greener’ ways of mobility or – relevant as it is still today – meet physical distancing ruling. All the aforementioned affairs come together in the overall question: how do we facilitate the City of the Future? 

Together with its business partners, Accenture Singapore has created its vision for the Future of Cities. These Metropolitan Areas should not only be the economic powerhouses of our world but also livable, safe, and sustainable locations that are by design inclusive to each stakeholder. Accenture Singapore brings together the relevant expertise and the best of class technology in their recently launched Future of Cities Innovation Hub; focusing on Sustainability, Mobility, and Safety & Security. We, InControl, are both happy and proud to announce that our simulation software is contributing to this Singapore Innovation Hub. In this manner, we are not only committed to the jointly created vision of the Future of Cities but strengthen our company mission statement: ‘’To deliver simulation software for a safe and sustainable planet.’’

But… how exactly is simulation contributing to future cities? To design cities’ infrastructures optimally, a thorough understanding of logistical flows is essential. Not only the logistical flow of pedestrians but also related to goods, rolling stock, energy, and even waste. The simulation of these processes and specific dynamics and scenarios provide tremendous information which in turn gives answers to complex, logistical issues. Think of capacity management, urban planning, and safety & security. Not only can simulation be part of the design phase of urban infrastructures, but it also plays a major role in real-time control and planning of operations. Possible congested areas or other (potential) issues related to public safety and security can be foreseen in an early stage, enabling authorities to act adequately and fast.

For simulating these scenarios, Metropolitan areas and City Authorities are visualizing the infrastructure in a so-called ‘digital twin’. However, to make this digital representation as realistic as possible enormous amounts of data are needed. A powerful software platform is key to process all this data of pedestrians, bikes and vehicular (public) traffic flows. InControl’s simulation software platform Enterprise Dynamics® (including Pedestrian Dynamics®) enables authorities to gather, enrich and process data from several sources like mobile devices, road and parking systems, and even weather stations! A digital twin facilitates the optimization of all flows in a city or any other infrastructure, providing information, insights and allowing quantifiable comparison of scenarios. By having this better understanding of pedestrian and other (public) transportation flows in congested areas during both regular and irregular days. The impact of bottlenecks, queues, and unsafe settings during e.g. city (re)development, road construction activities, or sports and other events, can be predicted and limited in an early stage and – even better – be avoided!           

Besides providing an overview of the distinct scenarios for a certain area, the simulation model also provides so-called ‘heat maps’. These maps provide information about the level of services provided in a certain area where not only the safety of pedestrians can be analyzed but also their level of comfort. Via both the simulation scenarios and heat maps, concretely and easily can be determined whether KPIs (Key Performance Indicators) are met.

With Simulation Software, InControl is not only contributing to the realization of City and Metropolitan Authorities’ goals but also providing a pleasant, safe, and secure setting for citizens, workers, and visitors. All around the world, for more than 30 years! Would you like to be fully in control of your urban infrastructure? Please do not hesitate to contact us. We are happy to tell you more about our experiences and expertise. 

Read more about Accenture’s Innovation Hub in this article.

InControl official Business Partner of Zeeuw & Zeeuw Feyenoord Basketball

InControl official Business Partner of Zeeuw & Zeeuw Feyenoord Basketball

As of this season InControl is proud Business Partner of Zeeuw & Zeeuw Feyenoord Basketball. With this partnership InControl will support the Feyenoord Basketball Scholarship, in which young talented basketball players are prepared for a career as a professional basketball player.

Paul de Vos, General Director Zeeuw & Zeeuw Feyenoord Basketball and Louis Schijve, CEO InControl

Paul de Vos, General Director Zeeuw & Zeeuw Feyenoord Basketball and Louis Schijve, CEO InControl

Feyenoord Basketball strongly believes in the development of talent and has therefore developed the Feyenoord Scholarship program ‘Becoming a Pro’. Two scholarships have been granted to two basketball talents Isai Sow and Philip Metz (both 19 years old). An important part of this program is media training and additional nutritional guidance. Even more important is that they train daily with the selection of coach Toon van Helfteren. 

Like Feyenoord, InControl invests in the development of talent, which is reflected in the tagline ‘Experience the Future’, and therefore InControl is confident that this sponsorship is a good fit.

As Zeeuw & Zeeuw Feyenoord Basketball is located in Rotterdam which has the largest port of Europe, InControl believes that with this Partnership they will not only stay connected with their Business Partners and Customers within the sports industry, but also within the Logistics and Supply Chain Industry.

Simulation for mechanical engineering and technical business administration

Simulation for mechanical engineering and technical business administration

For the graduation of two different courses it is the intention to optimize two different production processes. For the course in mechanical engineering at the HAN University of Applied Sciences the paint shop is optimized. Enterprise Dynamics is very suitable for this because during the process the new paint shop still had to be realized. By means of simulations, the most optimal control and product flow could be determined, making sure that the new paint shop could deliver good and efficient work from the start.

For the second course in technical business administration at Saxion University of applied Sciences, the goal is to determine whether it is profitable to implement a 3D print production in the process. The Enterprise Dynamics simulation model was used to determine the batch size for the 3D print process in order to produce as efficiently as possible and to maintain stock in the 2Bin system of assembly lines. On the basis of the results of the simulations it could be determined whether it is profitable to invest in the implementation of a 3D print production in the production process. Both assignments were carried out within the company Van Raam which is the global market leader in the production of customized bicycles for people with disabilities.

Robin Rust continuous using Enterprise Dynamics. Currently Robin Rust is following a Master Industrial Engineering & management at the University of Twente where he continues strengthening his knowledge in simulation.

Student Project: Optimization of a paint shop and 3D print process

Van Raam was founded in 1900 as a blacksmith’s shop in Amsterdam. In 1933 the first bicycles were made in Amsterdam. In the seventies the company moved to Aalten and started producing bicycle frames. In 1984 Van Raam was taken over by P. Boezel and started to specialize in the design and production of adapted bicycles and frames. In 2004 Van Raam moved to Varsseveld, after which it moved to its new premises in Varsseveld in early 2019. This building has a size of 13,500 square meters and has 150 employees. The Van Raam bicycles are all available as electric bicycles.

Van Raam is a family business and is the global market leader in the production of customized bicycles for people with disabilities or who are looking for more stability and security. Van Raam has been proclaimed by the Ministry of Economic Affairs, Agriculture and Innovation as the fourteenth most innovative company in the Netherlands.

At the beginning of 2019, Van Raam switched to a new and improved building. It was the opportunity to make big steps in the production process. For example, a completely new automated paint shop will be built and they were looking at how 3D printing can be implemented in the production process in order to create a constant flow.

The simulation software of Enterprise Dynamics was used to determine how these two innovations can best be used. Figure 1.3 shows the simulation used for the paint shop. This is structured as follows. In order to simulate a process as well as possible, all possible variations and demand patterns must be taken into account. The normal distribution is used for the capacity demand of the different assembly lines. The normal distribution is used to look at the reliability of a system. This is done by means of the standard deviation.

A requirement is that the employees of the spray booth work 85% of the day. In order to organise the flow of the paint shop as efficiently as possible, the outgoing products from the cooling tunnel have priority over the incoming products from the 1st part of the track.  The products from the cooling tunnel go either directly to the spray booth for the next layer, or first through the sticker lane, or to the assembly lines. By giving priority to these products, it is ensured that the products are occupied by the system and the employee(s) as soon as possible. This is also the reason why buffer 3 has priority over buffer 2 and buffers 2&3 again have priority over buffer 1.

In addition, the system has been designed in such a way that if batches are used, they will always stay together. When the first product of a batch passes a point where several products can enter at the same time, all other inputs are temporarily closed until the batch in question is complete.

The simulation of the 3D printing process is shown in Figure 1.4 and connects to the magazine and the assembly line. The simulation was used to find out how best to fill the 3D printer’s batch in order to produce as efficiently as possible and to maintain stock in the 2Bin system of assembly lines.

Through the simulation program, several scenarios were tested for a production time of more than 2400 hours. The best scenario is determined based on an optimal flow in which almost no intermediate stock is needed and all internal processes are well attuned. In the best scenario, only safety stock is used and Just in Time Delivery continues to be used, drastically reducing production time and stock levels. It will be easier to achieve a higher output.

Figure 1.1: Model Easy-Rider-2

Figure 1.2: Model Fun2Go

Figure 1.3: Paintshop simulation

Figure 1.4: 3D-print simulation

Student Simulation Project in Public Transportation Crowd Simulations at railway station Hoofddorp, The Netherlands

Student Simulation Project in Public Transportation Crowd simulations at railway station Hoofddorp, The Netherlands

Written by Jurian Fijen – Amsterdam University of Applied Science – Built Environment, Mobility

During my last year at the Amsterdam University of Applied Sciences, Bachelor of Built Environment (Mobility), I used a program called Pedestrian Dynamics of InControl for my thesis about crowd simulations at railway station Hoofddorp, the Netherlands.

I did my research in a graduation studio within my study Built Environment, which was supervised by two teachers and the Haarlemmermeer council. Hoofddorp is the main town of the Haarlemmermeer municipality. My research goal was to find out whether Hoofddorp railway station is capable of handling all pedestrian flows in the coming years. Expectations are the station will become busier. Are adjustments needed to the station? The expected increase is partly caused by the North-South metro line which is planned to be extended from Amsterdam to Schiphol Airport and Hoofddorp. Because of this extension, pedestrian flows at the station will change and become busier. The big question is whether the bottlenecks (stair cases, platforms and concourses) at the station will be sufficient to handle an increasing number of travellers.

For my thesis I first examined the concept of crowd simulations and looked at how this could be used at railway stations. To find out whether Hoofddorp station can handle the increased demand, I looked at two things: which data and other information do I need to model pedestrian flows and how can I find out when capacity is reached?

I used the crowd simulation program Pedestrian Dynamics of InControl to model and examine pedestrian flows. My supervisors from the university provided a Pedestrian Dynamics Student Pro license for my thesis project.  I used the programs tutorials and examples to master the program, after which I started my own case. By loading an AutoCAD map of the station into Pedestrian Dynamics the infrastructure was well implemented. Adding all data I gathered from the public transport time table, the available public transport equipment, pedestrians and accompanying numbers and routes, I was able to model the pedestrian flows into the station’s infrastructure.

3D Simulation Model of Hoofddorp trainstation

In the model using capacity requirements one can find out bottlenecks’ capacity. The functionality offered by Pedestrian Dynamics allows you to examine the station using frequency maps, density maps and flow counters which allow you to find the possible problems at the stations. This all can be clearly presented in a graph visualizing results over time. This program really helped to show me what a good pedestrian capacity study for Hoofddorp station could look like.

2D Simulation Model of Hoofddorp trainstation

My final assignment made me look differently at the built environment and public transport. When it comes to capacity problems in public transport, I mainly thought of too many passengers on the trains or too little space for even more trains on the track. It shows that stations will also have to be expanded in future, because it is becoming increasingly busy and there is too little room for passenger flows. I thought it was interesting to be able to demonstrate this in my thesis.

Personally, I think it can be interesting for many courses, such as Built Environment, Civil Engineering, Traffic Engineering, Urban Planning and Architecture, to include crowd simulations in the curriculum. It allows people to view outdoor spaces and buildings, such as stations, stadiums and shopping streets in a completely different way. Finally, we have seen recently how difficult it is to come up with good solutions for environments where the infrastructure is too narrow for too large groups of people.

I am happy that I used Pedestrian Dynamics for my assignment. It is a great program for modelling pedestrian flows in stations. The manual, the contact with the people at InControl, the tutorial and sample models have all ensured that Pedestrian Dynamics was a great program for me to work with. I would like to keep on using the program to further improve my skills and expand my knowledge about pedestrian flows.

There are many interesting research topics in the area of crowd simulation. At the moment, many organizations struggle with capacity issues and social distancing measures. Are you interested in a thesis project about crowd modelling with Pedestrian Dynamics? Pedestrian Dynamics Student Pro license is an affordable license for students working on their bachelor or master thesis.

Find more information here or contact our research and education team at education@incontrolsim.com

 

COVID-19 simulation by German Universities

University of Trier simulates stadium with INCONTROL simulation software

Coronavirus, lock down, reopening and specific protocols are headlines these days. In order to slow down and control COVID-19 several measures were published in Germany, such as school, café and restaurants closing and a general limitation of physical contact. These measures lead to severe restrictions on public and private life.

Governments, management of infrastructures, communities and local authorities wonder when and in what form these measures and protocols can be reduced or abolished. But what happens when a school closed due to Corona returns to regular operations? What will be the impact if under half of the population use an app that is supposed to help contain the corona virus?

These and other scenarios can be simulated using artificial intelligence methods on the computer. For this purpose, the working group of Mr. Prof. Timm at the University of Trier uses agent-based simulation models, which are enriched with various parameters such as disease courses and behavioral patterns of people. These simulations calculate how people interact at work, in schools or during free time and how a virus can spread. The calculated results help in the assessment of which measures makes sense, which tend not to be and when we can do without them again.

Some of the simulation models require input data that relate to statistical probabilities for the spread of an infectious disease in exemplary facilities: in theaters, stadiums, swimming pools, city areas, etc. To generate such data, possible effects of various measures are simulated and analyzed separately on a more detailed level in a flow of people. Independent questions regarding the implementation of various measures and their effectiveness can be evaluated directly in a flow simulation using a model of a specific environment. Pedestrian Dynamics® is the leading crowd simulation software fully supporting COVID-19 measures including physical distancing due to its overall and detailed analysis.

As one of the programs a group of students of the University of Trier (Germany) is currently analyzing the spread of the virus in a stadium. To support this research program INCONTROL provides software Pedestrian Dynamics®, a generic stadium model and supports them discussing technical aspects.

Are you interested in doing research with Pedestrian Dynamics® simulation software and/or modeling COVID-19 measures and protocols including physical distancing in any setting, please check: education@incontrolsim.com.

If relevant: the INCONTROL Training & Education team is standby to support you!